Two NCDDR Webcasts, September 3 and 17, 2008

TWO Upcoming Webcasts from the NCDDR's
Task Force on Systematic Review and Guidelines

Dear Colleague,

Following are announcements of two webcasts hosted by the National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (NCDDR).

Wednesday, September 3, 2008: The value of "traditional" reviews in the era of systematic reviewing

Wednesday, September 17, 2008: When the best is the enemy of the good - The nature of research evidence used in systematic reviews and guidelines

The 90-minute webcasts will begin at 3:00pm Eastern; 2:00pm Central; 1:00pm Mountain; 12:00pm Pacific. The webcasts are presented in collaboration with the Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU) program at Memorial Herman|TIRR.

The featured presenters are members of the NCDDR's Task Force on Systematic Review and Guidelines: Marcel P.J.M. Dijkers, PhD, FACRM; Michael Boninger, MD; Tamara Bushnik, PhD; Allen Heinemann, PhD; and David Vandergoot, PhD.

Webcast Registration (no fee to participate):
https://vovici.com/wsb.dll/s/12291g36c6c

If you would like to send questions before or during a webcast, please email your queries to: webcast@ncddr.org


About the Webcasts

The Task Force on Systematic Review and Guidelines develops and presents consensus/position statements and recommends strategies for systematic reviews/clinical practice guidelines in disability and rehabilitation research. The Task Force is made up of experienced NIDRR-funded researchers who volunteered to work in this capacity.

Beginning its work in 2006, the Task Force has developed two papers that are now ready for public review and comment. The first paper focuses on Systematic vs. Traditional Reviews (Sept. 3, 2008) while the second looks at Evidence in Systematic Reviews (Sept. 17, 2008).

Copies of the papers will be disseminated following the introductory webcasts, and an online discussion forum will be held for feedback and dialogue about the papers.

September 3: The value of "traditional" reviews in the era of systematic reviewing. Systematic reviews examine research studies on a topic and are becoming indispensable with the exponential growth of rehabilitation literature. Adherents of systematic reviews that support evidence-based practice often dismiss the value of "traditional" (eg. narrative, qualitative, non-systematic) reviews. However, problems that plague the latter also may be found in systematic reviews. Both types of reviews can be improved to serve the reader better in keeping up with the literature.

September 17: When the best is the enemy of the good - The nature of research evidence used in systematic reviews and guidelines. Evidence-based practice involves using the "best available" evidence, in addition to clinical expertise and patient preferences, to make decisions in health care (Sackett et al., 1996). However, many systematic reviewers interpret this as "best possible," and exclude from their reviews any evidence produced by other than randomized clinical trials (RCTs)—even if that means making no recommendations at all. Voltaire's comment that "the best is the enemy of the good" is applicable here, particularly for the field of rehabilitation, which frequently uses other research designs than RCTs.

About the Presenters

Marcel P.J.M. Dijkers, PhD, FACRM, is the Facilitator for the Task Force on Systematic Review and Guidelines. He is senior investigator in the NIDRR-funded Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on TBI Interventions, as well as for the New York TBI and Model Systems at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Dr. Dijkers is Research Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Michael L. Boninger, MD, is Director of the University of Pittsburgh Model Center on Spinal Cord Injury (UPMC-SCI), funded by NIDRR, and is Executive Director of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's Center for Assistive Technology. He is Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh, as well as the Associate Dean for Medical Student Research in the School of Medicine.

Tamara Bushnik, PhD, is Director of the Rehabilitation Research Center at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center (SCVMC) and Co-Director of the Northern California Traumatic Brain Injury Model System of Care. Dr. Bushnik is the Program Chair for the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and Chair of the TBI Model Systems' Dissemination Committee.

Allen W. Heinemann, PhD, is Director of the Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research, and associate director of Research, at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC). He has directed numerous NIDRR grants, including the RRTC on Measuring Rehabilitation Outcomes and Effectiveness, DRRP on Health Services Research, a Switzer Fellowship, Field Initiated Projects, an Innovation Award, and other RRTC projects. Dr. Heinemann is a Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University.

David Vandergoot, PhD, is Project Co-Director for the Employment Service Systems Research and Training Center (ESSRTC), a NIDRR-funded RRTC. He is President of the Center for Essential Management Services (CEMS) where he manages all aspects of research, training and demonstration projects.


We hope you will join us on Wednesday, September 3, 2008
AND
again on Wednesday, September 17, 2008!


These webcasts are supported through the National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (NCDDR), which is funded by the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), part of the U.S. Department of Education, and is supported in part by ILRU. The opinions and views expressed are those of the presenters and no endorsement by the funding agency should be inferred.

NIDRR Project Number: H133A060028
Questions or comments should be directed to: webcast@ncddr.org

National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research
SEDL
4700 Mueller Blvd.
Austin, TX 78723-3081
Phone: 800-266-1832
Fax: 512-476-2286